This is a dumping grounds for my thoughts while riddled with insomnia, general boredom, and whatever the hell else Tumblr is used for. (Posted material may be occasionally NSFW.)

"You're just jealous because I act stupid in public and people still talk to me."

Harry Potter, Starkid, so much Darren Criss your head might explode, Glee, baking, Mika, The Office, SNL, Misfits, Sherlock, Disney, puppies, assorted childhood memories, gratuitous pictures of food, some text posts but those are a few and far between and usually depressing and/or hilarious.

I've also got a more devoted Glee blog over here since it was sort of taking over this one.

My ask box is always open, and feel free to submit anything you think I'd enjoy.

April 23rd
1:18 PM
Via
1:14 PM
Via

retrotrash:

CAN I SCREAM THIS FROM THE ROOFTOPS

tamorapierce:

sully-s:

A mermaid 

Because they don’t always have to be whitewhitewhite.

tamorapierce:

sully-s:

A mermaid 

Because they don’t always have to be whitewhitewhite.

12:45 PM
Via
  • Jesus: Make sure nobody is poor
  • Everyone:
  • Jesus:
  • Everyone: So like industrial capitalism?

inabasket:

cool it comes with a free refill 

12:27 PM
Via

Sebastian Stan at Jane Eyre New York Premiere  3/9/2011

optimistfeminist:

madblackgirl:

frantzfandom:

where did this myth of the teenage temptress who lies about their age to seduce the older man come from?

grown men who dont want to take responsibility for their actions and like to place the blame on the most relevant easy target probably

BOOM!

a message from Anonymous


What never fails to turn you on?

rocketracoon:

agent phil coulson hugging his binder to his chest like a lovesick highschooler

theongreyjoy:

“Broad City,” a new series starting on Wednesday on Comedy Central, is funny, and, like so many other shows on that channel, brazen about skewering the millennial generation as hapless 20-somethings with no ambition, talent or self-respect. These slackers happen to be women, as the show’s creators, Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer, play comic versions of themselves. The show is as puerile and scatological as any male-centered series on Comedy Central, but oddly enough, it’s the self-degradation that gives it feminist cachet. As Sarah Silverman proved with her series on Comedy Central, “The Sarah Silverman Program,” which ran from 2007 to 2010, female characters are increasingly entitled to be as indolent, selfish and incompetent as male ones. That was not imaginable in earlier eras of television. The most successful sitcom heroines were plucky strivers, and the comedy lay in the pratfalls they took to achieve their goals — Lucy trying to break into show business on “I Love Lucy,” Mary Richards trying to mix love and career on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” or Murphy Brown trying to get her way on all things”